DGB Pathing — Explained

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It’s one of the most frequent issues that comes up in clan chat.   A new TH8 or TH9, looking for affirmation, will ask “Hey, can someone check my new war base?”.   So, I take two aspirin, and look.  More often than not:

  1.  There is a problem with pathing to the double giant bomb (DGB)
  2. There is a problem with placement of the DGB.

Either way, I stop further review, as proper pathing and/or placement of the DGB is a BIG deal — and sadly neither problem is fixed easily.   No DBG means every enemy that sees your base will be screaming “Hog Rider!!!!”.   You don’t want that.  LOL.  Now, it’s understandable that players new to DGB usage will have difficulty understanding how they should incorporate DGB and into their base, so I have uploaded a few pictures here that illustrate some of the DOs and DON’Ts of DGBs.

THE DOUBLE GIANT BOMB

First a little terminology: any DGB has three primary components. A launch point “LP” (a defense where hogs start), a DGB, and a Hook (a defense opposite the DGB intended to draw the hogs across the trap). Most good DGBs are valid with pathing from both directions, so depending on which angle the hogs approach from, the LP and the Hook may swap roles.

Illustrates the Launch Point and the Hook in DGB pathing.
Illustrates the Launch Point and the Hook in DGB pathing.

I am addressing two issues: PATHING and PLACEMENT. Pathing is the more complicated of the two issues, so I have devoted more slides to it. You need to understand that with hogrider AI, they will go from their attack point on the defense they are on, to the nearest attack point of another defensive building. With DGB placement, you need to try to ensure that the next closes attack point (the Hook) takes the hogriders laterally across both bombs at once, resulting in an instant kill. Commonly, players either fail to place an attack point across the DGB threat, or fail to “seal the sides,” to prevent hogs from pathing in a diamond around the DGB, detonating the bombs individually instead of together.

Here both sides of the path are sealed, hogs have  good hook, and will naturally trigger both bombs together.
Here both sides of the path are sealed, hogs have good hook, and will naturally trigger both bombs together.
Here the DGB is there, but the most likely path for hogs will only trigger one of the two GBs, failing to insta-kill.
Here the DGB is there, but the most likely path for hogs will only trigger one of the two GBs, failing to insta-kill.
The
The “RATR” (ring-around-the-rosy) dilemma. Very common. It looks foolproof, but hogs will actually normally circle the DGB and detonate the bombs individually.

The second issue is placement. Look at your own base. If you can see how a single hogrider could detonate one or more of the bombs, then you have VERY BAD placement. If you can see how a common shaping attack (KH, KH1, KH2, KHC, KHC1, KHC2, sLo) could easily eliminate pathing or trip the DGB, then you have weak placement. Generally, DGB threats in the outer layer are VERY BAD. DGBs near the core or in the interior are GOOD.

A nice example of a buried and well-pathed DGB.
A nice example of a buried and well-pathed DGB.
In this example, the pathing isn't the issue.  This DGB could be easily triggered by a single hog scout.
In this example, the pathing isn’t the issue. This DGB could be easily triggered by a single hog scout.

Another common issue we see is the “lengthwise” layout, where the defender places a DGB between two defenses, but does it so that in the 2×4 space separating them, the defenses are separated by 4 tiles rather than 2. This may work in some circumstances, but generally it is much weaker pathing than its counterpart. Recall that hogriders, upon destroying a defense, will path to the next closest defense. In most cases where we see a lengthwise placement there is another defense that is actually closer than the hook, invalidating the intended pathing.

Placed lengthwise, the hook is at least 4 tiles away from the hogs.  In most scenarios, they will not path effectively across.
Placed lengthwise, the hook is at least 4 tiles away from the hogs. In most scenarios, they will not path effectively across.

Finally, in addition to having a good pathed and buried DGB, a good base will have 3-4 credible DGB “threats.” These are 2×4 spaces with some pathing that makes an attacker wonder which one is the actual DGB. The more credible threats a base has, the more is will cause a determined hogger to expend valuable troops scouting potential threats. More likely, it will prevent people from attempting hogs on your base at all.

Here are some more examples with comments for you to consider as you look over your own war base, and ask yourself if you’re really defending against hogrider attacks.

Here the DGB is poorly placed and has no pathing.
Here the DGB is poorly placed and has no pathing.
An example with decent placement, but pathing problems.
An example with decent placement, but pathing problems.
The RART dilemma, although the DGB is at least buried.
The RART dilemma, although the DGB is at least buried.
Another example of a good DGB.  Although the wall gaps are unnecessary, the spring traps in this example would also be very effective.
Another example of a good DGB. Although the wall gaps are unnecessary, the spring traps in this example would also be very effective.
Although it looks to be close to an edge (I can see an army camp), the pathing for this DGB is good.
Although it looks to be close to an edge (I can see an army camp), the pathing for this DGB is good.
In addition to his poor choice with lengthwise placement, he has failed to seal one side.  Hogs will path to the AD, hitting these bombs individually.
In addition to his poor choice with lengthwise placement, he has failed to seal one side. Hogs will path to the AD, hitting these bombs individually.
“Uh… Hey guys…. I put a DGB in my base.” This one is ugly. It’s as if he wanted to protect his DGB from the hogriders.
This DGB is not sealed on one side, meaning hog will most likely detonate them individually.
This DGB is not sealed on one side, meaning hog will most likely detonate them individually.

Hope this helps explain a little bit about the role of the DGB, and what constitutes a well placed (buried) and well pathed (sealed, not-lengthwise, with a good hook and LP) DGB.

As a final note, if you are having trouble squeezing one into a base you are already using, you might try starting over.  A well-planned DGB is normally one of the first considerations in a base’s design, along with the CC and hero placement.  If you start over and build the base around the DGB, instead of trying to squeeze a DGB into a base you are already using, you may have more success.  Good luck!

Author: clashmustard

JTJ TH9 - One Tree reader for TH8 war attacks.

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